Vampires: Discloser and the public

Posted: Thursday, 16 July, 2015 by deacongray in Vampire Community

Alix
July 16, 2015 10:40 AM MST// By Deacon Gray

 

At this point the internet is flooded with articles about the study conducted by Dr. D.J. Williams, about people who call themselves a ‘Real Vampires’.  These are people who Identify themselves as needing blood, or some kind of energy taken from others in order to live a happy and healthy life.

He was concerned with the idea that people with this Identity feared disclosure to medical or mental/behavioral health providers, and thus were not seeking treatment when needed. On social media the various community groups and organizations have been flooded with articles related to the study, but is it a reasonable fear? Should the diverse VC population have concerns about what such professionals know about them?

Is it a matter of asking ourselves about the simple pros and cons? If that is the case, as a community there are very few benefits for stepping out as a group. As an individual there are benefits if you desire some kind of treatment for your version of vampirism, but otherwise, what benefit is there to exposure?

What we have seen from the latest round of academic inquiry is pretty much what we have come to expect and these headlines are good examples

“Is Vampire Discrimination a Thing?”
“Real Vampires Exist and they need counseling too”
“Vampires are real: New Research Exposes Them!”
“Why real life Vampires are afraid to go to the doctor”
“Human ‘Vampires’ keep doctors in the dark: Study”
“What it’s like to be a Real-Life Vampire”

For me these articles are a prime example of the issue at hand. When you speak to a provider you are immediately placing yourself up for consideration as mentally ill. This is the default position taken by both the medical and mental health fields when they hear such a claim, and it is no different in the media.  Even in the above articles the primary entry point for the writers are that; Yes there are some pretty weird people in the world but we should consider their feelings and needs regardless of what identity they claim, because they obviously need mental health treatment sometimes.

My issue is that nearly all these articles by-pass the possibility that there could be more to being a vampire, than simply being a behavioral health aberration.  In t heir view you self-identify as a ‘Vampire’ or, they link it to “clinical vampirism”  which is a bogus mental health term, or the community all out “butterfly nets and men in white coats,” ill in many of their eyes.

The original article pleads for understanding and compassion from providers, but in the end it is a plea for these providers not to lock up the patient before figuring out what their real complaint is. “I know you came in for extreme anxiety after your home invasion, but you said you are a vampire, so let’s focus on that instead. Do you plan to harm yourself or others?”

One of the issues, as it was pointed out to me today, is that the community is so diverse that you can’t really make any statement that represents all of it. I agree, and that is as true today as it was 30 years ago. At the same time people from outside of the community, and tourists inside the community, try to do that exactly, pigeon-hole the community.

All of these article have in common the single aspect that there are some mental health issues at stake, and no one really looks to see if there is any other cause. It tells the world that; There is a lot of diversity so we can accept these poor deluded souls, as long as they aren’t causing harm.

That is great for legal issues. When a spouse goes to court for custody with emails and Facebook posts where you are claiming to be a vampire, it would be nice to have the judge be compassionate and considerate of your “Identity” or “Beliefs”

But, it is far more likely that a denial and a good excuse will get you further. “Your honor, I certainly have an interest in the vampire in myth and the subculture, but I am a long way from believing that I sparkle in the sunlight. With the way the health care system is today, Sir, I would be lucky to live till I’m sixty.”

You know, statements that aren’t just true, but reasonable. Saying “I’m a vampire, I drink blood to stay healthy and I want full custody of my kids” might not have the effect you’re looking for.

Talking to a mental/behavioral health provider about your vampirism isn’t needed, but if you do feel the urge, consider the abstract look a little more. “Doc, I need to get my energy right” doesn’t sound as attention grabbing as “I need to feed on blood!”

I am not saying you should make excuses for what you are, only that you need to understand that what you are, isn’t locked into a single term.  You don’t have to declare your disposition to get that treatment.  
 If Depression, Anxiety or any other issue comes up that you need help with, you should seek it. Just don’t muddy the waters by insisting on a term usage, or if you do expect some level of treatment bias. You might be lucky and find an open minded doc, and I hope you do, but don’t expect it to be the average.

For me, I don’t want to see people in the community categorized as having a mental or behavioral health issue simply because we can’t find anything else at present. The lack of evidence doesn’t positively indicate that the issue at hand is simply a “self-Identity” or a mental health issue. We might just need more evidence.

It is up to each VC member to decide how much they want to expose their Vampirism, but the price of not exposing it is nearly nothing.  The price of exposing your vampirism, in whatever form it might be, could be devastating.

I know I wouldn’t give up my child just to hold onto a term that kind of represent who I am. I don’t see any benefit for fighting for the term with people who are clueless and likely to remains so, no matter what you tell them.

Look obviously it’s your life, do with it what you consider wise. I only ask you consider this…not disclosing isn’t going to stop you from marriage, it won’t keep your love life hidden, you won’t be discriminated against for not talking about it, the only way you can be against for being a vampire, is if you disclosing it to others, who in reality have no reason to know. It is firmly in your control.

 

 

Advertisements
Comments
  1. Anthony Hogg says:

    A well-written and balanced approach to the subject, Deacon. Kudos!

  2. Laura Shal says:

    an awful lot of spelling and grammar mistakes.

  3. I have worried about doctors and the lengths they would go…

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s